Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(3): 451-455  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.3.451
Association between Dietary Protein Intake and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults
Sang Joon Ze*, Ji Eun Lee, Ji Hyun Kim, Gyung Sil Lee, Su Kyung Kim
Department of Family Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
Sang Joon Ze
Tel: +82-2-2112-5643, Fax: +82-2-2112-5794
E-mail: dreaming-mail@hanmail.net
Received: July 19, 2016; Revised: September 21, 2016; Accepted: September 29, 2016; Published online: June 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: The effect of dietary protein intake on the risk of newly-onset metabolic syndrome remains unclear.
Methods: We obtained data from the health promotion center of a university hospital between 2007 and 2014 (7 years). The study population included 1,627 healthy adults without a diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia at their first visit. Dietary protein intake was obtained from a 1-day food record and quantified by using the low-carbohydrate, high protein score. We performed multivariate analysis to investigate the association between dietary protein intake and new-onset metabolic syndrome.
Results: During follow-up, with a median period of 20.7 months, we found 158 cases (9.7%) of metabolic syndrome confirmed by self-reported questionnaires data and blood test results. Dietary protein intake had no significant association with new-onset metabolic syndrome.
Conclusion: Dietary protein intake had no significant association with new-onset metabolic syndrome.
Keywords: Diet; Protein Intake; Metabolic Syndrome; Food Record
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