Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(4): 477-482  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.4.477
The Association between Sarcopenia and the Osteoporosis in Korean Men and Women Aged Older than 60 Years
Jae-Hyeok Ro1, Yong Soon Park1,*, Jeong-Hyeon Kim1, See-Won Kim2
1Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon; 2Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea
Yong Soon Park
Tel: +82-33-240-5311, Fax: +82-33-240-5440
E-mail: pyongs@hanmail.net
Received: July 1, 2016; Revised: September 29, 2016; Accepted: October 2, 2016; Published online: August 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: The objective of this study was to explore the association between sarcopenia and osteoporosis in a representative sample of elderly Korean men and women.
Methods: This study was based on data acquired in the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES) conducted in 2010. We assessed 1,728 Korean men and women aged above 60 years (765 men, 963 women). Bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between BMD of the lumbar spine, total hip, and femur neck and various parameters. Logistic regression analyses were performed to explore the association between the skeletal muscle index and osteoporosis.
Results: The results showed a significant correlation between total fat mass, skeletal muscle index, and total hip, femur neck, and lumbar spine BMD. The multiple linear regression analyses of all subjects showed that skeletal muscle index, as an independent variable, was a significant determinant of BMD. In the logistic regression analyses, osteoporosis prevalence decreased by 0.610 fold in men (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.416–0.894) and by 0.650 fold in women (95% CI, 0.467–0.905), with a 1 kg/m2 increase in the skeletal muscle index.
Conclusion: This study suggests that in Korean men and women over 60 years old, skeletal muscle index has a positive correlation with BMD and a decreased risk of osteoporosis.
Keywords: Sarcopenia; Osteoporosis; Skeletal Muscle Index; KNHANES
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