Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(4): 483-496  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.4.483
A Study on Cancer Survivorship Educational Programs for Health Professionals
Hye-Young Shim1, HyungKyun Mok2, Hyung-Kook Yang3, Dong Wook Shin4, So Young Kim5, Jong-Hyock Park6,7,*
1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam; 2Department of Public Health Sciences, Graduate School, Korea University; 3Cancer Survivorship Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang; 4Department of Family Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul; 5Public Health Medical Service, Chungbuk National University Hospital; 6College of Medicine, Graduate School of Health Science Business Convergence, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju; 7National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea
Jong-Hyock Park
Tel: +82-43-261-2873, Fax: +82-43-261-3459
E-mail: Jonghyock@gmail.com
Received: July 6, 2016; Revised: September 20, 2016; Accepted: September 23, 2016; Published online: August 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this study is to identify the educational needs of health professionals for cancer survivors and to propose an educational program to maintain comprehensive and continuing care throughout the cancer continuum of care for cancer survivors transitioning from acute care to long-term follow-up care.
Methods: An online survey of 208 respondents from the National Cancer Center, regional cancer centers, and the Korean Academy of Family Medicine was conducted from November 1 to December 13, 2013.
Results: Results found that 43.3% of the respondents mentioned a failure in physical, psychological, and social concerns. About 25.3% of them singled out a lack of relevant knowledge/information as the reason for failure to provide rehabilitation/support services. It was further found that, during the year prior to the survey, 74% of eligible respondents did not receive any cancer survivor-related educational programs. To promote educational programs for cancer survivor professionals, the respondents suggested standardization and securing the reliability of the educational content (51.0%) and strengthening specialist educational programs and policies, such as the training course accreditation program (50.5%).
Conclusion: This study is the first survey of the training needs of cancer specialists conducted among cancer specialists, and it can be used as basic data for developing a policy or program to improve the competencies of personnel who play key roles in providing cancer survivors with rehabilitation/support programs.
Keywords: Cancer; Survivors; Education
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