Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(4): 575-580  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.4.575
Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake Is Not Associated with Framingham Risk Score: Analysis of Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013
Suk-In Jung, Kyung-Min Nah, Nam-Seok Joo*
Department of Family Medicine, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Korea
Nam-Seok Joo
Tel: +82-31-219-5959, Fax: +82-31-219-5218
E-mail: jchcmc@daum.net
Received: July 13, 2016; Revised: October 11, 2016; Accepted: October 13, 2016; Published online: August 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: The influence of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid intake on cardiovascular risk is contested. We explored the relationship of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid intake with the Framingham risk score (FRS) in Koreans.
Methods: From 8,018 participants in the 2013 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the relevant data of 4,242 participants (1,753 males and 2,489 females) were selected and cross-sectionally analyzed. The FRS was compared by the tertiles of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, including daily dietary omega-6 fatty acid intake (n-6), daily dietary omega-3 fatty acid intake (n-3), and the ratio of dietary n-6 and n-3 fatty acid intake (n-6:n-3) after adjustment for relevant variables (age, systolic blood pressure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, myocardial infarction, angina, alcohol consumption, smoking, moderate activity, occupation, waist circumference, body mass index, calorie intake, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein).
Results: Mean age was 44.3 and 46.0 years in males and females, respectively. Dietary n-6 intake in males and females was 11.91 g and 1.89 g, respectively, while dietary n-3 intake in males and females was 8.31 g and 1.42 g, respectively. Mean FRS was 6.6 and 6.1 in males and females, respectively. FRS before adjustment was negatively correlated with dietary n-6 and n-3 intake, but positively correlated with n-6:n-3. However, FRS showed no differences after adjustment.
Conclusion: FRS showed no differences in the comparison according to the tertiles of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids. This could indicate that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids were not significantly associated with FRS.
Keywords: Fatty Acids, Polyunsaturated; Fatty Acids, Essential; Cardiovascular Diseases
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