Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(4): 588-595  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.4.588
Association between Sitting Time and Diabetes Mellitus, Cardiovascular Disease and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean: The Sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013 and 2014
So Yang An, Han Eol Kang, Seon Mee Kim*, Sang Ah Sok, Hyeon Jin Yang, Gyoeng Na Lee
Department of Family Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea
Seon Mee Kim
Tel: +82-2-2626-3276 , Fax: +82-2-837-0613
E-mail: ksmpdh@korea.ac.kr
Received: May 25, 2016; Revised: October 18, 2016; Accepted: October 25, 2016; Published online: August 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: The World Health Organization has indicated that insufficient physical activity (e.g. sedentary behavior) is one of the 10 leading risk factors of death worldwide. This study investigates the relationship between sedentary lifestyle and diseases, by assessing the prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and metabolic syndrome in Korea.
Methods: We analyzed data of 5,339 participants from the 2013 & 2014 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey, in this cross-sectional study. Sitting time per week was verified by means of a questionnaire. To determine the relationship between average sitting time and diseases, we used the multiple logistic regression analysis and presented results as odds ratio (95% confidence interval).
Results: With a sitting time >10 hours, the odds ratio of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases in participants older than 65 years were found to be 2.093 and 2.143 respectively. The odds ratio of diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome were <2 after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, smoke, drink, and exercise.
Conclusion: This survey found no relationship between sitting time and the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. A higher risk of hypercholesterolemia was found to be associated with sitting time of >10 hours in individuals >65 years. Therefore, the longer the sitting time, the higher the prevalence risk of cardiovascular disease.
Keywords: Sedentary Lifestyle; Diabetes Mellitus; Cardiovascular Diseases; Metabolic Syndrome; Hypercholesterolemia
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