Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(6): 812-817  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.6.812
Association between Sarcopenia and Bone Mineral Density (T-Score) in Korean Elderly Man (Above 50): Using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2010
Sang-Eun Yu, Ye-Won Hwang*, Won-chul Yang, Ji-wook Lee
Department of Family Medicine, Bupyeong Serim Hospital, Incheon, Korea
Ye-Won Hwang
Tel: +82-32-509-5570, Fax: +82-32-517-4814
E-mail: kidinlove@hanmail.net
Received: February 28, 2017; Revised: October 17, 2017; Accepted: October 22, 2017; Published online: December 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: This study investigated the association between sarcopenia and bone mineral density (BMD) (T-score) according to age, using a representative sample in Korea.
Methods: We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010. Logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association between sarcopenia and BMD in men older than 50 years of age.
Results: The analysis showed that the odds ratio for development of a low BMD was 3.157 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.434–6.951) in the obese group with sarcopenia, aged 60–69 years. At age 70 or older, the odds ratio was 2.197 (95% CI, 1.467–3.292) in the non-obese group with sarcopenia. The odds ratio in the non-obese group with sarcopenia was 4.841 (95% CI, 2.265–10.346) for all ages over 50 years. At age 50–59 years, there was no statistical significance.
Conclusion: In Korea, BMD is closely associated with sarcopenia in men over 50 years of age. With aging, body composition changes because of complex interactions among muscle, bone, and fat. Further studies of these interrelationships may contribute to the treatment and prevention of sarcopenia and osteoporosis.
Keywords: Sarcopenia; Osteoporosis; Obesity; T-Score
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