Korean J Fam Pract. 2017; 7(6): 837-843  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2017.7.6.837
Stress Relief Method and Depression
Minok Jung, Wooseok Choi, Yongjae Lee*
Department of Family Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Yongjae Lee
Tel: +82-2-2019-3481, Fax: +82-2-2019-8209
E-mail: ukyjhome@yuhs.ac
Received: March 7, 2017; Revised: June 16, 2017; Accepted: July 26, 2017; Published online: December 20, 2017.
© Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: Depression has a significant impact on the physical and mental health, leading to a deterioration in daily function. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between depression and those who choose 11 different ways to relieve stress.
Methods: We used data from the 2005 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and included 3,523 participants. The study consisted of 11 groups. They included: those who did not do anything and did not make use of any stress relief method (13.5±0.8), those who drank (23.0±0.9), those who smoked (12.6±0.7), those who exercised (20.0±0.9), those who engaged in conversations (11.6±0.7), those who sought entertainment (3.2±0.5), those who engaged in cultural activities (5.4±0.5), those who engaged in religious activities (3.0±0.3), those who did something else (housework etc.) (1.6±0.2), those who slept (4.8±0.5), and those who dealt with stress by eating (1.3±0.3). After adjusting for confounding variables, multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for depression.
Results: Of the respondents, 51.9% were men and the average age was 38.8 years. The analysis showed that the ORs (95% confidence intervals) for depression according to those who drank alcohol as a stress relief method, relaxed by smoking, and dealt with stress by eating were 1.862 (1.239–2.796), 1.676 (1.045–2.687), and 3.323 (1.337–8.258), respectively.
Conclusion: People who smoke, drink, or relieve stress by eating are more likely to be depressed compared to those who do nothing and do not make use of stress relief methods.
Keywords: Stress; Depression; Korea
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