Korean J Fam Pract. 2018; 8(4): 512-517  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2018.8.4.512
The Correlation between Korean Version of the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale Score and Smoking Cessation Success Rate
Won-Wook Jeong, Yu-Jin Paek*, Young-Gyun Seo, Hong-Ji Song, Kyung-Hee Park, Hye-Mi Noh, Hyun-Suk Lee, Yu-Jeong Choi
Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang, Korea
Yu-Jin Paek Tel: +82-31-380-1780, Fax: +82-31-380-1782 E-mail: paek@hallym.or.kr ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9573-8849
Received: June 23, 2017; Revised: August 31, 2017; Accepted: September 13, 2017; Published online: August 20, 2018.
© The Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: In this study, we analyzed the relationship between the Korean version of the mindfulness attention awareness scale (K-MAAS) and the success rate of smoking cessation among participants of a smoking cessation camp.
Methods: Among the 285 subjects who entered our hospital smoking cessation camp, 211 were selected for the study, excluding 74 participants who missed the K-MAAS questionnaire or refused to complete the questionnaire. The K-MAAS scores were divided into three groups (tertiles). In the 12th week after discharge, urine cotinine qualitative tests or telephone surveys were used to identify whether the participants had discontinued smoking.
Results: The percentages of men, those with spouses, and health insurance subscribers were higher in the smoking cessation group than in the failure group. The smoking cessation group included participants with lower smoking initiation ages than those in the failure group, but the varenicline use rates and days were higher than those in the failure group. Meanwhile, the proportion of patients with psychiatric illnesses was higher in the failure group than in the smoking cessation group. After adjustments for age, sex, and smoking initiation age, the odds ratios for the intermediate and lowest groups were 2.58 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14–5.85) and 2.57 (95% CI, 1.09–6.08), respectively, compared with that for the highest K-MAAS score group. However, in addition to the three adjustments, there was no statistical significance when adjusting for spouse presence, health insurance subscription, varenicline use, and psychiatric history.
Conclusion: Lower K-MAAS scores were associated with higher success rates of the 12-week smoking cessation camp, but this was not statistically significant.
Keywords: Mindfulness; Korean Version of the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale; Smoking Cessation; Varenicline
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