Korean J Fam Pract. 2016; 6(6): 598-603  https://doi.org/10.21215/kjfp.2016.6.6.598
Association between Coffee Consumption and Sarcopenia in Older Adults: A Cross Sectional Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2011
Sinae Oh, Hye Kyung Shin, Ji Won Lee, Duk Chul Lee*
Department of Family Medicine, Yonsei University, Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea
Duk Chul Lee
Tel: +82-2-2228-2331, Fax: +82-2-362-2473
E-mail: faith@yuhs.ac
Received: July 25, 2016; Revised: September 18, 2016; Accepted: September 27, 2016; Published online: December 20, 2016.
© The Korean Academy of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Background: Previous studies, using in vitro and in vivo models, have reported the beneficial effects of coffee on skeletal muscle, including the coffee-induced decrease in sarcopenia progression. However, the effect of coffee on skeletal muscle mass and function in humans has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to examine the association between coffee consumption and sarcopenia (coffee induced decrease in sarcopenia progression) as well as regeneration of injured muscle in a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older Korean adults.
Methods: This was a population-based cross-sectional study conducted in a nationally representative sample of Korean adults aged ≥65 years. We utilized data from the Fourth and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 2008 to 2011 and enrolled 2,578 individuals (1,105 men, 1,473 women) for this study. Food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the frequency of coffee consumption. Appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) was measursed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and sarcopenia was defined using the weight-adjusted ASM variable. A logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between coffee consumption and sarcopenia, after adjusting for potential confounders.
Results: In women, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of sarcopenia in coffee drinkers drinking ≤1 cup/day, 2 cups/day, ≥3 cups/day was 0.612 (0.368-1.017), 0.637 (0.351-1.154), and 0.090 (0.014-0.589), respectively. In men, however, there was no significant association between coffee consumption and sarcopenia.
Conclusion: Coffee consumption was inversely associated with sarcopenia in older Korean women.
Keywords: Coffee; Sarcopenia; Skeletal Muscle; Elderly
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